Indications for Antiviral Treatment in Patients with Herpes Zoster

Primary infection with varicella–zoster virus (VZV) results in chickenpox, characterized by viremia with a diffuse rash and seeding of multiple sensory ganglia, where the virus establishes lifelong latency. Herpes zoster is caused by reactivation of latent VZV in cranial-nerve or dorsal-root ganglia, with spread of the virus along the sensory nerve to the dermatome.
Continue reading

Diagnostic Criteria for Chronic HBV Infection

Chronic HBV infection is a necroinflammatory disease of the liver caused by persistent infection with HBV, and can be categorized as hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positive or negative. Inactive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers have HBV infection of the liver without significant, ongoing necroinflammatory disease. HBV infection is resolved when there is no further virologic, biochemical, or histologic evidence of active viral infection or disease.
Continue reading

Clinical Criteria for the Diagnosis of Acute Bacterial Sinusitis

Acute bacterial sinusitis in children is diagnosed on the basis of the history, with the use of the criteria. Imaging studies (plain-film radiography, computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and ultrasonography) show signs of sinus inflammation but are not recommended in patients with uncomplicated infection, given the low specificity of these studies.
Continue reading

Cierny-Mader Staging System for Long Bone Osteomyelitis

Cierny and Mader classified osteomyelitis based on the affected portion of the bone, the physiologic status of the host and the local environment. This classification lends itself to the treatment and prognosis of osteomyelitis; stage 1 (medullary osteomyelitis) can usually be treated with antibiotics alone, while stages 2, 3 and 4 (superficial, localized and diffuse osteomyelitis) usually require aggressive debridement, antimicrobial therapy and subsequent orthopedic reconstruction.
Continue reading

Definition of Postdiarrheal Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS)

1996 Case Definition

Clinical description
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by the acute onset of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, renal injury, and a low platelet count. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) also is characterized by these features but can include central nervous system (CNS) involvement and fever and may have a more gradual onset. Most cases of HUS (but few cases of TTP) occur after an acute gastrointestinal illness (usually diarrheal).

Continue reading

Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Hospital-Acquired (or Nosocomial) Pneumonia (HAP)

Acute nosocomial pneumonia is broadly defined as pneumonia characterized by a new and persistent infiltrate (radiographically present for greater than 48 hours) PLUS one of the following:

Continue reading

Case Definition for Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection (Swine Flu)

After identification of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in Mexico, a case definition was developed. The initial definition of suspected novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infection included any hospitalized patient with severe acute respiratory illness. On May 1, 2009, this definition was expanded to include any person with acute respiratory illness defined as fever and either sore throat or cough. On May 11, 2009, the definition of suspected case was changed again to include any person with:

Continue reading

1996 CDC Case Definition for Syphilis (Treponema pallidum)

Syphilis is a complex sexually transmitted disease that has a highly variable clinical course. Classification by a clinician with expertise in syphilis may take precedence over the following case definitions developed for surveillance purposes.

Continue reading

Case Definition of Streptococcal Toxic-Shock Syndrome (Streptococcal TSS) and Necrotizing Fasciitis*

I. Streptococcal TSS

A. Isolation of group A Streptococcus

1. From a sterile site

2. From a nonsterile body site

B. Clinical signs of severity

1. Hypotension

2. Clinical and laboratory abnormalities (requires two or more of the following):

a) Renal impairment

b) Coagulopathy

c) Liver abnormalities

d) Acute respiratory distress syndrome

e) Extensive tissue necrosis, i.e., necrotizing fasciitis

f) Erythematous rash

Continue reading